Need Assistance? Call us at (512) 814-8044, or submit a ticket

Survive Cyber Attacks With A Backup And Disaster Recovery Plan

data backup and recovery cloud services

There’s no way to predict the future, and Murphy’s Law tells us that anything that can go wrong will go wrong. If you and your business or organization do not have a well-thought out recovery plan, your company’s data is teetering on the edge of a cliff without a safety net.

Having a comprehensive and well thought-out data backup and disaster recovery plan in place when there is data loss can help your organization or business survive malicious cyber attacks like ransomware.

In the last few years, we’ve seen plenty of organizations in the news for suffering huge damage from cyber attacks. And there does not seem to be any pointers that cyber incidents are going to reduce any time soon.

However, while cyber attacks as a cause of downtime have almost doubled as the cause of data loss, the rate at which it continues to cause downtime havoc will depend on improvements made to defensive and responsive measures like having a backup and disaster recovery plan.

What are backup and disaster recovery?

There’s an important distinction between backup and disaster recovery.

Backup is the process of making an extra copy (or multiple copies) of data. You back up data to protect it. You might need to restore backup data if you encounter an accidental deletion, database corruption, or problem with a software upgrade.

Disaster recovery, on the other hand, refers to the plan and processes for quickly reestablishing access to applications, data, and IT resources after an outage. That plan might involve switching over to a redundant set of servers and storage systems until your primary data center is functional again. (more…)

Share

Comments Off on Survive Cyber Attacks With A Backup And Disaster Recovery Plan

How Software Vendors Encourage The Use Of Insecure Legacy Applications

QuickBooks "Internet Explorer is turned off" Error Message

Generally speaking, it is a common practice among IT professionals to associate bad user experience and clunky User Interfaces with legacy applications, and we bemoan the reluctance of users to use new and modern applications “that are right there.”

As a matter of fact, while we very often lament the refusal of technology users to wean themselves away from using legacy or outdated applications, the reality could be that sometimes, users have no choice in the matter: use legacy apps, or productivity comes to a screeching halt.

What Is A Legacy Application?

A legacy application (legacy app) is a software program that is outdated or obsolete. Although a legacy app still works, it may be unstable because of compatibility issues with current operating systems (OSes), browsers and information technology (IT) infrastructures. – – Definition from TechTarget

For example, at the start of 2016, Microsoft ended support for all versions of Internet Explorer (IE) prior to version 11. Users still browsing with older versions like IE 6 could continue to do so, but website pages were no longer going to be coded to be compatible, and any bugs or errors within the Internet Explorer program will not receive attention from Microsoft. (more…)

Share

Comments Off on How Software Vendors Encourage The Use Of Insecure Legacy Applications

Safeguard Your Organization From Evolving Cyber Threats

Safeguard depiction for cloud services, file folder and laptop

Businesses today face a constantly evolving set of potential threats, from data security breaches to downtime from unexpected events. To safeguard your organization from evolving cyber threats, use solutions that help protect your business data and minimize the disruptions caused by unexpected events.

Against the backdrop of these evolving threats, businesses and organizations are asking critical questions like:

  • With growing use of the cloud and mobile devices at work, how can we keep business data protected?
  • As my data grows, how can I make sure it is all backed up without spending a fortune?
  • If an unexpected event occurred, like a fire, physical break-in, flood, or cyber attack, how long would it take our business to get back online?
  • What would this downtime cost our business?
  • How do we keep up with a constantly changing compliance landscape?

To safeguard your business and organization from increasingly sophisticated cyber and internal threats to data, it is imperative that modern protection for evolving threats be put in place with emphasis on solutions that help protect critical business data and minimize the disruptions caused by unexpected events. (more…)

Share

Comments Off on Safeguard Your Organization From Evolving Cyber Threats

Proactive Technology Management As Money Saver For Small Businesses

Computer network administrator working with many applications in a proactive technology management environment.

Every dollar a small business spends needs to have an immediate and quantifiable return. This is especially true for critical services such as I.T. support. If you are one of the millions of small businesses that depend upon your technology to keep your business running, proactive Technology Management will save you money, improve your efficiencies and reduce your downtime.

The Solution

With the advent of new monitoring tools and the ability to remotely deliver help desk services to small businesses all over the world, Managed IT Services Providers have developed proactive Technology Management plans for their clients that maximize their uptime and reduce I.T. costs over time. By implementing newly available automated processes, systems can be patched and updated overnight without the need for onsite visits, or disrupting an organization’s work day. (more…)

Share

Comments Off on Proactive Technology Management As Money Saver For Small Businesses

Common Business Scams and How Your Organization Can Avoid Them

Preventing Business Scams Image by Tech Prognosis

Business scams by con artists are not new and seem to be evolving every day. You probably already know about, or have had some experience with, the most common ones – robocalls about winning a prize, computer problems, quick credit fix etc. Sometimes, it is an “invoice” that is supposedly from a business partner.

And in some cases, a business scam can come in the form of debt-collection notices, or dire warnings about an expiring web address, domain name or trademark if you don’t send money immediately.

There have even been reports of business scams involving toner cartridges or other office supplies showing up at offices out of the blue with a bogus bill.

The common thread with all business scams is that they attempt to sow fear, play on greed or plea to the kind-heartedness of people.

According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), these business scams by con artists succeed because the criminals are banking on the likelihood that most small and medium-sized businesses, churches, and not-for-profit groups will end up paying the bogus invoices in the mistaken belief they owe money or that it’s simply a misunderstanding.

The devastating aftermath of successful business scams though, is that the savings of many businesses and organizations are plundered before the scam is discovered. And the sad part of it all is that many are never caught thus making the scam industry a multi-billion-dollar enterprise. Research put it at over $50 billion annually. (more…)

Share

Comments Off on Common Business Scams and How Your Organization Can Avoid Them

Six Risk-Based Questions for Nonprofits With In-House Computer Experts

Image of admin for Nonprofits

Nonprofits and other small and medium sized organizations must ask these six questions before their In-House Computer Expert Quits to avoid disaster.

Here’s an important question most nonprofits don’t think about: what would happen if the in-house IT guru suddenly quit? Most nonprofit leaders think it would only be a temporary inconvenience when, in fact, the opposite is usually true. Want to know how much you are at risk?

If you are the Executive Director, President, or leader of a nonprofit organization, ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Does your nonprofit organization have a written network documentation about its computer network?
    What software licenses do you own? What are the critical administrator passwords to your systems and devices? How is your computer network structured?  What hardware do you own and when do your equipment warranties expire?  Are there cloud vendors for email, online storage, etc. that you don’t’ currently have?
    Do you allow a single IT person to keep this information under their full control over your network and nonprofit organization?  If they suddenly left for any reason, this could lead to huge consequences for your nonprofit organization.

(more…)

Share

Comments Off on Six Risk-Based Questions for Nonprofits With In-House Computer Experts
Close Menu
Share
Share