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Credential Management Vulnerabilities Exposed By Breaches

Credential Management BreachThe recent breach of OneLogin is once again shining the spotlight on the safety and sanity of entrusting sensitive data to cloud-based credential management services. OneLogin provides single sign-on for cloud-based applications.

What Is A Credential Management Service?

Credential management services that offer Single Sign-On or SSO are great, but as we are beginning to find out, it could also be a single point of entry to a treasure trove of sensitive data for cyber criminals.

How Does A Credential Management Service Work?

The way credential management services work is that after a user of these Identity and credential management services sign into their account, the service takes care of remembering and supplying the customer’s usernames and passwords for all of their other applications. It pretty much attempts to save the user the pain and stress of trying to remember numerous passwords, security questions and other hoops people normally have to jump through just to access some online services.

What Is The Problem With Credential Management Services?

While a lot of these services promise secure access to, and a simplified Identity and Access Management (IAM), the recent spate of multiple breaches of LastPass and now OneLogin makes us wonder just how efficient and  secure these credential management services really are. And here is why: a single compromise exposes the credentials of all users, especially if that data theft includes the ability to decrypt encrypted data [thanks to Mark Maunder of Wordfence for that emphasis].

A breach that allows intruders to decrypt customer data could be extremely damaging for affected customers.

The vulnerabilities in credential management services like LastPass were so bad that Tavis Ormandy, a security researcher at Google’s Project Zero wondered if people were “really using this lastpass thing” because he took a quick look and could see “a bunch of obvious critical problems”. (more…)

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The DigiNotar Breach: Another Exposure of Negligence

In case you have not heard, another SSL Certificate provider, Dutch certificate authority DigiNotar, a subsidiary of Vasco Data Security, was breached recently and from the preliminary report coming from the company that did an audit, it looks pretty bad.

Some of the names in the list of bogus certificates generated by the attackers include Comodo, Google, Thawte, Microsoft, Mozilla, WindoswUpdate, WordPress’ MI6, the CIA, Facebook and Twitter. (more…)

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The Distribute IT Fiasco: Risk Management Done Wrong

“It is not the strongest species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change” – Charles Darwin.

In today’s business world, where organizations face ever-escalating customer demands and expectations and little room for downtime, logic dictates that businesses today are seriously revamping their business continuity and risk management plans, or developing one if they did not have any.

This is even more pertinent given what we have witnessed in recent months in the areas of data breaches, hack attempts and the underground “war” being waged in cyberspace that has put most of the world’s powerful organizations on the defensive. (more…)

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The RSA Breach: Time for Full Disclosure?

As more companies with national security interests come forward with admission of breaches related to the hacking of RSA’s SecurID technology, one wonders if it is time for RSA to break its stubborn refusal to tell the public what exactly was stolen or when the breach actually occurred. At this stage, it is not just enough to tell the public that it had been hit by a phishing email exploiting a zero-day vulnerability in Adobe Reader. (more…)

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Encryption Tools for the Mobile Executive

Most companies provide their senior executives with laptops or netbooks and tablets so they can be productive even when on the road. This is even more true of corporate executives who sometimes demand anytime, anywhere access to data residing on corporate servers. The big corporations can afford to spend millions of dollars on data protection hardware and software.

The same cannot be said of executives in small and medium-sized organizations, especially when it comes to loss of personal information, including credit card data, patient records or other financial information, stored by the company. Data breaches happen and information is lost every day due to small mistakes that could have been avoided. For small businesses, these events can be devastating. (more…)

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